You are here
Home > tourism > Fourth country with the largest extension of tropical forests

Fourth country with the largest extension of tropical forests

Fourth country with the largest extension of tropical forests

60% of the Peruvian territory is covered by forests. Meanwhile, our country is considered the fourth in the world with the largest extension of tropical forests. (Photo: Andina)

Amazon

In the framework of the celebration for the International Day of the Tropical Forests, we remember that our country is the fourth in the world with the largest extension of these areas

Every June 26 marks the International Day of Tropical Forests and Peru is one of the countries worldwide that has much to celebrate.

60% of the Peruvian territory is covered by forests, which makes it the ninth country with the largest forest area on the planet and the fourth as the holder of tropical forests.

The extensive forest area of ​​Peru guarantees a great biodiversity that is expressed in that 70% of the food plants and 80% of the medicinal plants come from the forests. It also houses a great diversity of animal species, many of which are endemic, that is, they live only in our territory.

Likewise, more than 50 indigenous peoples live in the country’s forests, who together with the National Forest Conservation Program of the Ministry of the Environment (Minam) and other authorities, work to preserve and take advantage of this natural heritage in a sustainable way, in order to reduce Global warming through the control of the temperature of the planet.

Without forests

Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions could not be contained, just as life on the planet would be impossible, since there would be no rivers. It is worth pointing out that Peru is the country in Latin America with the greatest availability of this vital resource; 97% of fresh water is found in our Amazon.

Forest conservation also prevents soil erosion, which in turn causes landslides affecting the road, energy infrastructure and populations living in the immediate vicinity and low-lying areas.

The Amazonian forests of Peru are organized into a set of territorial categories, which gives each forest area a responsibility for its management. One of these categories is guarded by indigenous and peasant communities.

Other categories are protected natural areas, as well as forest concessions. However, about a quarter of the forests are not yet categorized, which makes them more vulnerable to their misuse and destruction.

In 2010, the Minam created the National Program of Forest Conservation for the mitigation of climate change, in order to contribute to the preservation and sustainable development of this resource.

Gallery:

Without forests, carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions could not be contained, nor would rivers. (Photo: Andina)

The Amazonian forests in Peru harbor a great diversity of animal species, many of which only live in our territory. (Photo: Andina)

More than 50 indigenous peoples live in the country’s forests, which are also responsible for preserving and contributing to the sustainable development of these areas. (Photo: Andina)

In order to protect these forests, a set of territorial categories have been organized, such as natural protected areas and forest concessions. (Photo: Andina)

In 2010, the Ministry of the Environment created the National Forest Conservation Program for the mitigation of climate change, in order to contribute to the preservation and sustainable development of this resource. (Photo: Andina)

Deja un comentario

Top

If you continue using this site you accept the use of cookies. more information

Los ajustes de cookies de esta web están configurados para "permitir cookies" y así ofrecerte la mejor experiencia de navegación posible. Si sigues utilizando esta web sin cambiar tus ajustes de cookies o haces clic en "Aceptar" estarás dando tu consentimiento a esto.

Cerrar